ART 304- Radical Rectangles

Geometric sihouettes help acheive modern and edgy looks. Linear designscreate fashion that extends or distorts body shape, by hiding the natural curves. Straight lines have been present in fashion revolutions, a move towards androgenous style. Suzy Menkes mentions how geometry can also be achieved by color blocking.

However when the pattern peices of a garment are geometric shapes, the results are not always linear and crisp.  This design strategy can result in drape and the shapes can become distorted as they hang on the body.

In my design, I created seperates. The top is created using the honeycomb tunisian crochet stitch on the top upper rectangular panals. I used extended standard stitch on the band around the bottom. Because the two rectangles are attached only at the corners of the shoulders, the top has more flexibility to stretch around the form of the body.

The skirt is created using 5 rectangles. The side panals were crocheted using the knit stitch. The middle panels use the standard stitch. I was hoping that I would not have to add a waist band, however trying it on the dress form the side gaped a lot, so I had to pin darts in. But this will be an easy fix to ease a waistband onto the skirt to improve the fit, while still adhering to the rectangular requirements.

Overall, I am pleased with my design, however I think that as an ensemble the color combination did not work as well I wanted.

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ART 304- Zero Waste Garment

Zero waste is an exciting way to produce clothing. It’s a puzzle where the finished result offers your more than the satisfaction of figuring it out, but also the reassurance that you contributed to the solution of a problem in the fashion industry…textile waste. My mission as a designer is to raise awareness to eco friendly and sustainable fashion.

Zero waste is a really fascinating and creative way to approach the design of a garment.  It requires much more thought and dedication than designing with waste. Timo Rissanen from Parsons encourages zero waste designers to “keep an open mind  regarding the final outcome… [which will allow you ] to explore and invent new outcomes.”

For this project I designed a pair of gusseted pants with large side pockets. The basic shapes were rectangles, which is one of the easiest ways to address the problem of zero waste. However I wanted to challenge these basic shapes by making a pair of pants which usually needs a curve in the crotch.  Overall I am pleased with how my design turned out.  I intend to continue to experiement with zero waste and follow Rissanens advice of keeping an open mind in the design process.  I am looking forward to challenging myself further with this design technique

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